The Arenal Area Magazine

Frog species vanish even before they are discovered


By the University of Maryland news staff

The first before-and-after view of an amphibian die-off has just been published by scientists working at the Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute in Panamá and the University of Maryland.

Like a wave, the fungal disease that wipes out frogs — chytridiomycosis — is advancing through the Central American highlands at a rate of about 30 kilometers per year. After the disappearance of Costa Rica’s golden frogs in the 1980s, Karen Lips, associate professor of biology at the University of Maryland, quickly established a monitoring program at untouched sites in neighboring Panamá.

Of the 63 species that she identified during surveys of Panama’s Omar Torrijos National Park located in El Copé from 1998 to 2004, 25 species disappeared from the site in the subsequent epidemic. As of 2008, none of these species had reappeared there.

Were there additional species in the park not previously known to scientists? To find out, the authors used a genetic technique called DNA barcoding to quickly estimate that another 11 unnamed or candidate species were also present. In DNA barcoding, short genetic sequences that uniquely identify known species are generated and stored in public databases. By comparing DNA profiles from unknown organisms to the databases, researchers can identify biological specimens quickly, and construct genetic lineages. Combining the field data with the genetic information, the authors discovered that five of these unnamed species were also wiped out.

“It’s sadly ironic that we are discovering new species nearly as fast as we are losing them,” said Andrew Crawford, former postdoctoral fellow at Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute and member of the Círculo Herpetológico de Panamá, now at the University of the Andes in Colombia. “Our DNA barcode data reveal new species even at this relatively well- studied site, yet the field sampling shows that many of these species new to science are already gone here.”

An epidemic that wipes out a whole group of organisms is like the fire that burned the famous

University of Maryland photo by Andrew J. Crawford Panamanian Golden Frog

library of Alexandria. It destroys a huge amount of accumulated information about how life has coped with change in the past. Species surveys are like counting the number of different titles in the library, whereas a genetic survey is like counting the number of different words.

“When you lose the words, you lose the potential to make new books,” said Ms. Lips, who directs the University of Maryland graduate program in sustainable development and conservation biology. “It’s like the extinction of the dinosaurs. The areas where the disease has passed through are like graveyards. There’s a void to be filled, and we don’t know what will happen as a result.”

“This is the first time that we’ve used genetic barcodes — DNA sequences unique to each living organism — to characterize an entire amphibian community,” said Eldredge Bermingham, Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute director and co-author. “Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute has also done barcoding on this scale for tropical trees . . . in our forest dynamics-monitoring plot in Panamá. The before-and-after approach we took with the frogs tells us exactly what was lost to this deadly disease, 33 percent of their evolutionary history.”

The U.S. National Science Foundation and the Bay and Paul Foundation funded the field work for this study, which is published online by the Proceedings of the National Academy of Science. Collection permits were provided by Panama’s environmental authority. The Smithsonian Tropical Research Institute, headquartered in Panama City, Panamá, is a unit of the Smithsonian Institution.

Advertisements

One response

  1. Good blog post, you deserve a free iPad: http://snipurl.com/zvwmq

    July 27, 2010 at 6:50 pm

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s